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161

Part Three

1946-1947

6
terms
2
notes

W. Adorno, T. (2005). Part Three. In W. Adorno, T. Minima Moralia: Reflections from a Damaged Life. Verso, pp. 161-255

165

Sleepless night: so there is a formula for those tormented hours, drawn out without prospect of end or dawn, in the vain effort to forget time's empty passing. But truly terrifying are the sleepless nights when time seems to contract and run fruitlessly through our hands. We put out the light in the hope of long hours of rest that can bring succour. But as our thoughts run wild the night's healing store is squandered, and before we have banished all sights from beneath our burning lids, we know that it is too late, that we shall soon feel the rough shake of morning. [...] Man's life becomes a moment, but not suspending duration but by lapsing into nothingness, waking to its own futility in face of the bad eternity of time itself. In the clock's over-loud ticking we hear the mockery of light-years for the span of our existence. [...] In his state of complete powerlessness the individual perceives the time he has left to live as a brief reprieve. He does not expect to live out his life to the end. The prospect of violent death and torture, present to everyone, is prolonged in the fear that the days are numbered, that the length of one's own life is subject to statistics; that growing old has become a kind of unfair advantage gained over the average. [...]

who hurt you (but also, yes, v relatable)

—p.165 by Theodor W. Adorno 10 months, 4 weeks ago

Sleepless night: so there is a formula for those tormented hours, drawn out without prospect of end or dawn, in the vain effort to forget time's empty passing. But truly terrifying are the sleepless nights when time seems to contract and run fruitlessly through our hands. We put out the light in the hope of long hours of rest that can bring succour. But as our thoughts run wild the night's healing store is squandered, and before we have banished all sights from beneath our burning lids, we know that it is too late, that we shall soon feel the rough shake of morning. [...] Man's life becomes a moment, but not suspending duration but by lapsing into nothingness, waking to its own futility in face of the bad eternity of time itself. In the clock's over-loud ticking we hear the mockery of light-years for the span of our existence. [...] In his state of complete powerlessness the individual perceives the time he has left to live as a brief reprieve. He does not expect to live out his life to the end. The prospect of violent death and torture, present to everyone, is prolonged in the fear that the days are numbered, that the length of one's own life is subject to statistics; that growing old has become a kind of unfair advantage gained over the average. [...]

who hurt you (but also, yes, v relatable)

—p.165 by Theodor W. Adorno 10 months, 4 weeks ago

(noun) a fabric with horizontal stripes in strongly contrasted colors

173

the poem about the God and the bayadere

—p.173 by Theodor W. Adorno
unknown
10 months, 4 weeks ago

the poem about the God and the bayadere

—p.173 by Theodor W. Adorno
unknown
10 months, 4 weeks ago

(noun) perception

173

the same narrow-minded percipience

—p.173 by Theodor W. Adorno
confirm
10 months, 4 weeks ago

the same narrow-minded percipience

—p.173 by Theodor W. Adorno
confirm
10 months, 4 weeks ago
176

[...] The bourgeois have made of satiety, which might be akin to bliss, a term of abuse. Because others go hungry, ideology requires that the absence of hunger be thought vulgar. So the bourgeois indict the bourgeois. Their own exemption from work proscribes the praise of idleness: the latter is called boring. The hectic bustle to which Schopenhaeuer alludes springs less from the unbearableness of a privileged condition than from its ostentatious, which, according to the historical situation, is designed either to increase social distance or, by purportedly important displays, apparently to reduce it, to emphasize the usefulness of the masters. If people at the top are really bored, it is not because they suffer from too much happiness, but because they are marked by the general misery; by the commodity character that consigns amusements to idiocy, by the brutality of the command which echoes terribly in the rulers' gaiety, finally by the fear of their own superfluity. None who profit by the profit system may exist within it without shame, and this deforms even the undeformed joys [...]

incidentally, i would love to see a left cultural critique of a show like Gossip Girl, ideally from a place of something sympathy instead of merely scorn

—p.176 by Theodor W. Adorno 10 months, 4 weeks ago

[...] The bourgeois have made of satiety, which might be akin to bliss, a term of abuse. Because others go hungry, ideology requires that the absence of hunger be thought vulgar. So the bourgeois indict the bourgeois. Their own exemption from work proscribes the praise of idleness: the latter is called boring. The hectic bustle to which Schopenhaeuer alludes springs less from the unbearableness of a privileged condition than from its ostentatious, which, according to the historical situation, is designed either to increase social distance or, by purportedly important displays, apparently to reduce it, to emphasize the usefulness of the masters. If people at the top are really bored, it is not because they suffer from too much happiness, but because they are marked by the general misery; by the commodity character that consigns amusements to idiocy, by the brutality of the command which echoes terribly in the rulers' gaiety, finally by the fear of their own superfluity. None who profit by the profit system may exist within it without shame, and this deforms even the undeformed joys [...]

incidentally, i would love to see a left cultural critique of a show like Gossip Girl, ideally from a place of something sympathy instead of merely scorn

—p.176 by Theodor W. Adorno 10 months, 4 weeks ago

(verb) to break apart or in two; separate by or as if by violence or by intervening time or space / (verb) to become parted, disunited, or severed

185

Wealth shall vouch for the possibility of reuniting what is sundered

—p.185 by Theodor W. Adorno
notable
10 months, 4 weeks ago

Wealth shall vouch for the possibility of reuniting what is sundered

—p.185 by Theodor W. Adorno
notable
10 months, 4 weeks ago

selfhood; individual identity (from Latin "ipse" for self)

223

Kafka: the solipsist without ipseity.

fuck i love this

—p.223 by Theodor W. Adorno
notable
10 months, 4 weeks ago

Kafka: the solipsist without ipseity.

fuck i love this

—p.223 by Theodor W. Adorno
notable
10 months, 4 weeks ago

(adj) relating to entities and the facts about them; relating to real as opposed to phenomenal existence (philosophy)

229

no ontic interior on which social mechanisms merely act externally

—p.229 by Theodor W. Adorno
notable
10 months, 4 weeks ago

no ontic interior on which social mechanisms merely act externally

—p.229 by Theodor W. Adorno
notable
10 months, 4 weeks ago

(noun) an insect in its final, adult, sexually mature, and typically winged state / (noun) an idealized mental image of another person or the self

232

the collective imago of total error

—p.232 by Theodor W. Adorno
confirm
10 months, 4 weeks ago

the collective imago of total error

—p.232 by Theodor W. Adorno
confirm
10 months, 4 weeks ago