Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

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Introduction

1
terms
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notes

Fuller, M. (2017). Introduction. In Fuller, M. How to Be a Geek: Essays on the Culture of Software. Polity Press, pp. 1-14

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To be a geek is, in one way or another, to be over-enthused, over-informed, over-excited, over-detailed. There is an awkwardness born out of a superfluity of an extraneous kind of desire that becomes a febrile quiver in the face of an interesting problem. To be geeky is to have too much interest in something to the detriment of comportment, code spilling over into a gabble, a liveliness found in something that a more reserved protocol would keep under wraps or avoid. To be a geek is to be a bit too public with your enthusiasms, to be slightly unaware in turn that these thrills may, to others, rightly be dull as dust dehydrated with a special process of your own invention. Its mixture of juiciness and dryness, being able to get juiced on dryness, perhaps gets to the core of the problem. Frankly, it's a ludicrous position to be in — it is after all a bit bewildering to find this stuff so fascinating — but it is one whose perversity puts it in a strange relation of proximity to fundamental dynamics in contemporary life.

Such a condition leads many geeks into precariously powerful positions. Companies founded and staffed by geeks rule the world in any ways. They fill institutions and create commercial entities. One can be both ludicrous and lucrative, a maniac for certain details that remake the cosmos by their syntax, or that found a new grammar of relation between things. Geeks created the internet and fight over its meaning. They govern and subvert governance, or keep it ticking over with regular incremental upgrades. Geeks produce extravagant contraptions that cement their positions in the most comedically venal ways, but they also make machines with panache that auto-destruct in deserts and car parks and servers; sometimes intentionally. They make games that provide the grounds of individualism for millions, and then find the wealth it occasionally brings depressing pointless but irresistible.

—p.2 by Matthew Fuller 10 months, 1 week ago

To be a geek is, in one way or another, to be over-enthused, over-informed, over-excited, over-detailed. There is an awkwardness born out of a superfluity of an extraneous kind of desire that becomes a febrile quiver in the face of an interesting problem. To be geeky is to have too much interest in something to the detriment of comportment, code spilling over into a gabble, a liveliness found in something that a more reserved protocol would keep under wraps or avoid. To be a geek is to be a bit too public with your enthusiasms, to be slightly unaware in turn that these thrills may, to others, rightly be dull as dust dehydrated with a special process of your own invention. Its mixture of juiciness and dryness, being able to get juiced on dryness, perhaps gets to the core of the problem. Frankly, it's a ludicrous position to be in — it is after all a bit bewildering to find this stuff so fascinating — but it is one whose perversity puts it in a strange relation of proximity to fundamental dynamics in contemporary life.

Such a condition leads many geeks into precariously powerful positions. Companies founded and staffed by geeks rule the world in any ways. They fill institutions and create commercial entities. One can be both ludicrous and lucrative, a maniac for certain details that remake the cosmos by their syntax, or that found a new grammar of relation between things. Geeks created the internet and fight over its meaning. They govern and subvert governance, or keep it ticking over with regular incremental upgrades. Geeks produce extravagant contraptions that cement their positions in the most comedically venal ways, but they also make machines with panache that auto-destruct in deserts and car parks and servers; sometimes intentionally. They make games that provide the grounds of individualism for millions, and then find the wealth it occasionally brings depressing pointless but irresistible.

—p.2 by Matthew Fuller 10 months, 1 week ago
3

[...] the figure of the geek, as something both powerful and flawed. The geek tragedy improves on the traditional mixture of these two qualities by adding the figure of technology. This variant of the tragedy is there since that of Icarus, who flew too close to the sun and melted his wings. If the traditional reading of Icarus is a warning about the hubris of knowledge in relation to nature and the inviolable space of the gods, technology folds in both violation and knowledge as constitutional factors. Any attempt to 'White Box' technology as a simple Good that needs no examination misses this fundamental transformative characteristic. [...]

need to unpack this more (esp the last bit)

—p.3 by Matthew Fuller 10 months, 1 week ago

[...] the figure of the geek, as something both powerful and flawed. The geek tragedy improves on the traditional mixture of these two qualities by adding the figure of technology. This variant of the tragedy is there since that of Icarus, who flew too close to the sun and melted his wings. If the traditional reading of Icarus is a warning about the hubris of knowledge in relation to nature and the inviolable space of the gods, technology folds in both violation and knowledge as constitutional factors. Any attempt to 'White Box' technology as a simple Good that needs no examination misses this fundamental transformative characteristic. [...]

need to unpack this more (esp the last bit)

—p.3 by Matthew Fuller 10 months, 1 week ago

the highest point in the development of something; culmination or climax

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the modulation between apotheosis and disappearance

—p.8 by Matthew Fuller
notable
10 months, 1 week ago

the modulation between apotheosis and disappearance

—p.8 by Matthew Fuller
notable
10 months, 1 week ago