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This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading.

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179

At the Multiplex, 2006

4
terms
5
notes

reviews of a bunch of different films. the memorable ones:

Smith, Z. (2009). At the Multiplex, 2006. In Smith, Z. Changing My Mind: Occasional Essays. The Penguin Press HC, pp. 179-211

181

This is no fault of the actress herself, whose comeliness is as self-evident and insistent as the wafting cherry blossom and the orange lanterns floating on pellucid water, the sumptuous silk of the kimono and the trimmed perfection of the formal gardens--all of which we are repeatedly encouraged to appreciate until you begin to feel that if something ugly does not appear on-screen soon you might go quite out of your mind.

in a review of Memoirs of a Geisha. thought it was pretty writing and also funny

—p.181 by Zadie Smith 3 years, 5 months ago

This is no fault of the actress herself, whose comeliness is as self-evident and insistent as the wafting cherry blossom and the orange lanterns floating on pellucid water, the sumptuous silk of the kimono and the trimmed perfection of the formal gardens--all of which we are repeatedly encouraged to appreciate until you begin to feel that if something ugly does not appear on-screen soon you might go quite out of your mind.

in a review of Memoirs of a Geisha. thought it was pretty writing and also funny

—p.181 by Zadie Smith 3 years, 5 months ago

translucently clear

181

the orange lanterns floating on pellucid water

—p.181 by Zadie Smith
notable
3 years, 5 months ago

the orange lanterns floating on pellucid water

—p.181 by Zadie Smith
notable
3 years, 5 months ago
188

[...] "I did it for my family" is the most repeated line in this film. Its echo is silent, yet you can't help hearing it: what would you do for yours?

"Its echo is silent" is a nice way of putting it (inspiration for my Man in the High Castle review)

—p.188 by Zadie Smith 3 years, 5 months ago

[...] "I did it for my family" is the most repeated line in this film. Its echo is silent, yet you can't help hearing it: what would you do for yours?

"Its echo is silent" is a nice way of putting it (inspiration for my Man in the High Castle review)

—p.188 by Zadie Smith 3 years, 5 months ago
193

Lean's sad, buttoned-up account of unconsummated love is about all of us and our cautious natures. It's not that the English don't want true love or self-knowledge. Rather unlike our European cousins, we will not easily give up the real for the dream. We remain skeptical about throwing away a concrete asset like Fred in favor of "the faery power of unreflecting love," no matter how much Keats may recommend it. Laura, a Midlands mother of two, is certainly not a fairy by temperament, despite her pixie face. She will not give up the reality of Fred for her love of Alec. Alec, gentleman that he is, quite agrees. An Italian (or indeed, the modern English viewer of the film) will diagnose Laura and Alec as morbidly repressed. The film offers a different hypothesis: that the possibility of two people's pleasure cannot override the certainty of other people's pain. Primum non nocere is the principle upon which the film operates. As a national motto we could do a lot worse.

reviewing the film Brief Encounter

—p.193 by Zadie Smith 3 years, 5 months ago

Lean's sad, buttoned-up account of unconsummated love is about all of us and our cautious natures. It's not that the English don't want true love or self-knowledge. Rather unlike our European cousins, we will not easily give up the real for the dream. We remain skeptical about throwing away a concrete asset like Fred in favor of "the faery power of unreflecting love," no matter how much Keats may recommend it. Laura, a Midlands mother of two, is certainly not a fairy by temperament, despite her pixie face. She will not give up the reality of Fred for her love of Alec. Alec, gentleman that he is, quite agrees. An Italian (or indeed, the modern English viewer of the film) will diagnose Laura and Alec as morbidly repressed. The film offers a different hypothesis: that the possibility of two people's pleasure cannot override the certainty of other people's pain. Primum non nocere is the principle upon which the film operates. As a national motto we could do a lot worse.

reviewing the film Brief Encounter

—p.193 by Zadie Smith 3 years, 5 months ago

first, do no harm

193

Primum non nocere is the principle upon which the film operates.

—p.193 by Zadie Smith
uncertain
3 years, 5 months ago

Primum non nocere is the principle upon which the film operates.

—p.193 by Zadie Smith
uncertain
3 years, 5 months ago

political (originally communist) propaganda, especially in art or literature

195

a glowing review of a fine piece of agitprop leftist cinema

on George Clooney's Good Night, and Good Luck

—p.195 by Zadie Smith
notable
3 years, 5 months ago

a glowing review of a fine piece of agitprop leftist cinema

on George Clooney's Good Night, and Good Luck

—p.195 by Zadie Smith
notable
3 years, 5 months ago

relating to or denoting the political and economic theories of Karl Marx and Friedrich Engels (noun or adj)

202

Gaghan's talent is for Marxist explication, demonstrating how one transaction contains within it elements of the entire system it supports.

about Syriana

—p.202 by Zadie Smith
notable
3 years, 5 months ago

Gaghan's talent is for Marxist explication, demonstrating how one transaction contains within it elements of the entire system it supports.

about Syriana

—p.202 by Zadie Smith
notable
3 years, 5 months ago
207

[...] a story that in book form was an act of fury and lit a fire under the Thatcher-era kids who read it. Its message was not "Blow up the Houses of Parliament" or "Wear a white mask and knife people," for kids are not morons and understand what an allegory is. The message of V for Vendetta is "Change is possible." In its film form this is a truly radical notion to be filed in the adolescent brain right next to the message of the first Matrix movie: the world is other than it seems. If this film makes kids think that way again, that'll be, like, totally awesome.

—p.207 by Zadie Smith 3 years, 5 months ago

[...] a story that in book form was an act of fury and lit a fire under the Thatcher-era kids who read it. Its message was not "Blow up the Houses of Parliament" or "Wear a white mask and knife people," for kids are not morons and understand what an allegory is. The message of V for Vendetta is "Change is possible." In its film form this is a truly radical notion to be filed in the adolescent brain right next to the message of the first Matrix movie: the world is other than it seems. If this film makes kids think that way again, that'll be, like, totally awesome.

—p.207 by Zadie Smith 3 years, 5 months ago
209

[...] What if the "problem" is neither genetic nor psychological, but social? For what did "women trapped in a male body" do three hundred years ago? Maybe they expanded the social category of what it is to be male so that it was expansive enough to include the "female" traits they longed for.

I kind of agree with this POV but I also want to see rebuttals (probably along the lines of: what would be great systemically doesn't exactly work for the individual within the system)

—p.209 by Zadie Smith 3 years, 5 months ago

[...] What if the "problem" is neither genetic nor psychological, but social? For what did "women trapped in a male body" do three hundred years ago? Maybe they expanded the social category of what it is to be male so that it was expansive enough to include the "female" traits they longed for.

I kind of agree with this POV but I also want to see rebuttals (probably along the lines of: what would be great systemically doesn't exactly work for the individual within the system)

—p.209 by Zadie Smith 3 years, 5 months ago