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227

All LinkedIn with Nowhere to Go

2
terms
1
notes

on the cultural bleakness of linkedin

Friedman, A. (2014). All LinkedIn with Nowhere to Go. In Lehmann, C., Summers, J. and Frank, T. No Future for You: Salvos from the Baffler. Mit Press, pp. 227-240

(noun) a painkilling drug or medicine

232

a weirdly totalizing kind of centrism: keep your political ideas as anodyne as your business aphorisms

—p.232 by Ann Friedman
notable
4 years ago

a weirdly totalizing kind of centrism: keep your political ideas as anodyne as your business aphorisms

—p.232 by Ann Friedman
notable
4 years ago

(noun) the concluding part of a discourse and especially an oration / (noun) a highly rhetorical speech

234

such perorations are like the incantation of a devotional prayer: they call down the mercies of a remote techno-deity in order to ritually cleanse the grubbier aspirations of the business-strategizing, keynote-speaking class

—p.234 by Ann Friedman
notable
4 years ago

such perorations are like the incantation of a devotional prayer: they call down the mercies of a remote techno-deity in order to ritually cleanse the grubbier aspirations of the business-strategizing, keynote-speaking class

—p.234 by Ann Friedman
notable
4 years ago
238

Every once in awhile, though, you’ll run across some decent practical advice on LinkedIn. A post about avoiding frequent-flier miles scams—another one of LinkedIn’s top “influencer” posts of all time—has some unwittingly trenchant advice for aspiring thought leaders. “First,” author Christopher Elliott explains, “only a few people at the top of the scam benefit in any meaningful way. And second, many of those elite program apologists will do anything to defend the system that has rewarded them.” You don’t say.

—p.238 by Ann Friedman 4 years ago

Every once in awhile, though, you’ll run across some decent practical advice on LinkedIn. A post about avoiding frequent-flier miles scams—another one of LinkedIn’s top “influencer” posts of all time—has some unwittingly trenchant advice for aspiring thought leaders. “First,” author Christopher Elliott explains, “only a few people at the top of the scam benefit in any meaningful way. And second, many of those elite program apologists will do anything to defend the system that has rewarded them.” You don’t say.

—p.238 by Ann Friedman 4 years ago