Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

230

Struggles and Grassroots Organizing in an Extended European Choke Point

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in Italy. migrant labour is a major factor here - migrants 10.3% of all employees, and in Northern Italy's logistics sector, they're 80% in many warehouses (mostly from Africa, Eastern/Southeastern Asia)

Benvegnù, C. and Cuppini, N. (2018). Struggles and Grassroots Organizing in an Extended European Choke Point. In Ness, I. and Alimahomed-Wilson, J. (eds) Choke Points: Logistics Workers Disrupting the Global Supply Chain. Pluto Press, pp. 230-242

238

[...] in recent years many employers -- mostly the big multionational delivery companies able to make large investments -- started to increase their use of technology and, alongside this, changed their attitude toward grassroots unionism. Then, rather than putting in place anti-union policies and taking on the risk of a labor conflict (and thus of serious economic losses), they are changing their strategy in order to increase productivity and regain control over labor through co-optation or cooperation with the union.

[...] As the complex inter-firm networks and contracting chains that were used in the past to reduce costs become less profitable because labor costs have increased, many big companies are reconsidering the possibility of internalizing labor in order to retake control over the whole labor process.

an agreement signed between Cobas and major delivery companies

—p.238 by Carlotta Benvegnù, Niccolò Cuppini 4 days ago

[...] in recent years many employers -- mostly the big multionational delivery companies able to make large investments -- started to increase their use of technology and, alongside this, changed their attitude toward grassroots unionism. Then, rather than putting in place anti-union policies and taking on the risk of a labor conflict (and thus of serious economic losses), they are changing their strategy in order to increase productivity and regain control over labor through co-optation or cooperation with the union.

[...] As the complex inter-firm networks and contracting chains that were used in the past to reduce costs become less profitable because labor costs have increased, many big companies are reconsidering the possibility of internalizing labor in order to retake control over the whole labor process.

an agreement signed between Cobas and major delivery companies

—p.238 by Carlotta Benvegnù, Niccolò Cuppini 4 days ago