Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

161

Interrupt

by Simon Yuill

(missing author)

1
terms
1
notes

cites Latour's Reassembling the Social, Derrida's Of Grammatology, Dijkstra

? (2008). Interrupt. In Fuller, M. (ed) Software Studies: A Lexicon. MIT Press, pp. 161-167

ambiguous; occupying a position at, or on both sides of, a boundary or threshold

163

we might describe the operational space of software in the context of a user at a desktop system as having a liminal boundary

—p.163 missing author
notable
1 year, 3 months ago

we might describe the operational space of software in the context of a user at a desktop system as having a liminal boundary

—p.163 missing author
notable
1 year, 3 months ago
165

If the interrupt teaches us anything about software, it is that software is in many cases only as effective as the people who use it, those mondeterministic machines with their complex, non-reproducible behaviors, those "others" on whom it relies--can it really control such beasts? To understand software in terms of the interrupt is to understand it in terms of its place within larger structures of social formation and governance. Software engineering is simultaneously social engineering. Software criticism, therefore, must also be simultaneously social. In critically engaging with software, we must not only map the vectors of the interrupt, but also seek to make our own interruptions, to pose questions and insert alternative vectors and practices within the assemblages it connects to.

—p.165 missing author 1 year, 3 months ago

If the interrupt teaches us anything about software, it is that software is in many cases only as effective as the people who use it, those mondeterministic machines with their complex, non-reproducible behaviors, those "others" on whom it relies--can it really control such beasts? To understand software in terms of the interrupt is to understand it in terms of its place within larger structures of social formation and governance. Software engineering is simultaneously social engineering. Software criticism, therefore, must also be simultaneously social. In critically engaging with software, we must not only map the vectors of the interrupt, but also seek to make our own interruptions, to pose questions and insert alternative vectors and practices within the assemblages it connects to.

—p.165 missing author 1 year, 3 months ago