Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

1

Technology and Social Power

3
terms
4
notes
Needs summary

Kirkpatrick, G. (2008). Technology and Social Power. In Kirkpatrick, G. Technology and Social Power. Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 1-13

2

[...] Technology and power are implicated in one another historically and in contemporary social arrangements. There is no experience of technology that is not at the same time an experience of a kind of social power, but it does not always involve domination. [...]

—p.2 by Graeme Kirkpatrick 1 year, 7 months ago

[...] Technology and power are implicated in one another historically and in contemporary social arrangements. There is no experience of technology that is not at the same time an experience of a kind of social power, but it does not always involve domination. [...]

—p.2 by Graeme Kirkpatrick 1 year, 7 months ago

a contradiction between two beliefs or conclusions that are in themselves reasonable; a paradox

5

We are limited by mortality, illness and impediments set by the physical world. Technology is one response to this antinomical situation.

—p.5 by Graeme Kirkpatrick
confirm
1 year, 7 months ago

We are limited by mortality, illness and impediments set by the physical world. Technology is one response to this antinomical situation.

—p.5 by Graeme Kirkpatrick
confirm
1 year, 7 months ago
6

[...] part of technology design is precisely the art of making clear to the user what they can and cannot do with it. Technology design always involves both a closing off of the technology's innards into a "black box" and the projection of messages on its outer surface that will guide the user into successful operation of the artefact. There is a concealed politics here, akin to statecraft. How technological artefacts are presented to users involves a politics of design that reflects features of the social content. It is here that we find the politics of the relationship between technology and social power. [...]

—p.6 by Graeme Kirkpatrick 1 year, 7 months ago

[...] part of technology design is precisely the art of making clear to the user what they can and cannot do with it. Technology design always involves both a closing off of the technology's innards into a "black box" and the projection of messages on its outer surface that will guide the user into successful operation of the artefact. There is a concealed politics here, akin to statecraft. How technological artefacts are presented to users involves a politics of design that reflects features of the social content. It is here that we find the politics of the relationship between technology and social power. [...]

—p.6 by Graeme Kirkpatrick 1 year, 7 months ago
7

[...] a second dimension to the operation of power. This involves influence and authority, rather than force and coercion. Analysis of two-dimensional power draws attention to the way that compliance is secured from subject populations by making them perceive the world in such a way that certain questions are not asked. Exercise of this kind of power proceeds not by making threats but by suppressing problems before they are thematized in any public discourse. If two-dimensional power is used effectively, the result will be that people are influenced into doing what the powerful want them to do, or they may simply see it as the obvious right thing to do. Here it is not necessary to deploy a superior capacity for violence in order to exercise power. [...]

drawing on Steven Lukes, who himself draws on Robert Dahl's one-dimensional conception

—p.7 by Graeme Kirkpatrick 1 year, 7 months ago

[...] a second dimension to the operation of power. This involves influence and authority, rather than force and coercion. Analysis of two-dimensional power draws attention to the way that compliance is secured from subject populations by making them perceive the world in such a way that certain questions are not asked. Exercise of this kind of power proceeds not by making threats but by suppressing problems before they are thematized in any public discourse. If two-dimensional power is used effectively, the result will be that people are influenced into doing what the powerful want them to do, or they may simply see it as the obvious right thing to do. Here it is not necessary to deploy a superior capacity for violence in order to exercise power. [...]

drawing on Steven Lukes, who himself draws on Robert Dahl's one-dimensional conception

—p.7 by Graeme Kirkpatrick 1 year, 7 months ago

(noun) preponderant influence or authority over others; domination / (noun) the social, cultural, ideological, or economic influence exerted by a dominant group

8

Hegemony is secured through a strategic politics aimed at prestructuring social practices in line with the interests of one's one group.

—p.8 by Graeme Kirkpatrick
notable
1 year, 7 months ago

Hegemony is secured through a strategic politics aimed at prestructuring social practices in line with the interests of one's one group.

—p.8 by Graeme Kirkpatrick
notable
1 year, 7 months ago

(noun) a painkilling drug or medicine

9

Defined merely as the capacity to affect others, power is an anodyne concept, lacking sufficient purchase to single out significant instances as important.

this is kind of a weird way of using anodyne (very divorced from its original meaning) but I can sort of see it

—p.9 by Graeme Kirkpatrick
notable
1 year, 7 months ago

Defined merely as the capacity to affect others, power is an anodyne concept, lacking sufficient purchase to single out significant instances as important.

this is kind of a weird way of using anodyne (very divorced from its original meaning) but I can sort of see it

—p.9 by Graeme Kirkpatrick
notable
1 year, 7 months ago
20

[...] As members of a society in which extensive technology use has made access to goods, like illumination, simple and convenient, we have lost our appreciation of the centrality of revelatory experience and of our own activity in determining that experience. We have closed on possibilities of revealing the world other than those that conform to the model of throwing a switch to get what we want. Modern culture is uniquely embedded in technology and in consequence we have a limited view of the world, which Heidegger calls "enframing". What is regrettable about technology is that it obscures or even destroys other ways of finding meaning. And the kind of life that it opens onto is one in which means and ends are separated so that we find ourselves performing instrumental routines aimed at consumption, rather than appreciating the full range of meaning possibilities available to us as a matter of existential fact. [...]

—p.20 by Graeme Kirkpatrick 1 year, 7 months ago

[...] As members of a society in which extensive technology use has made access to goods, like illumination, simple and convenient, we have lost our appreciation of the centrality of revelatory experience and of our own activity in determining that experience. We have closed on possibilities of revealing the world other than those that conform to the model of throwing a switch to get what we want. Modern culture is uniquely embedded in technology and in consequence we have a limited view of the world, which Heidegger calls "enframing". What is regrettable about technology is that it obscures or even destroys other ways of finding meaning. And the kind of life that it opens onto is one in which means and ends are separated so that we find ourselves performing instrumental routines aimed at consumption, rather than appreciating the full range of meaning possibilities available to us as a matter of existential fact. [...]

—p.20 by Graeme Kirkpatrick 1 year, 7 months ago