Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

315

le1o9n8a0rd

7
terms
6
notes

Tom Aberant's first-person monologue (saved, I believe, as a Word document on his laptop) about his relationship with Anabel as well as his brief interaction with Andreas Wolf. I actually really, really liked this. Felt very real and raw.

Franzen, J. (2015). le1o9n8a0rd. In Franzen, J. Purity. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, pp. 315-444

flakiness; containing or made up of small particles that have been aggregated

323

The New Jersey sky was a low-hanging steambath of churning flocculence

—p.323 by Jonathan Franzen
confirm
3 years, 11 months ago

The New Jersey sky was a low-hanging steambath of churning flocculence

—p.323 by Jonathan Franzen
confirm
3 years, 11 months ago
340

[...] In her disappointment with him, she idealized the truly wealthy, attributing improbable virtues to them. She'd cashed in her youth and her looks for life in a cramped three-bedroom house with a tin-pot progressive too good and kind to be divorced, and in her rage against her stupid-innocence she found better men to admire: Goldwater, Senator Charles Percy, later Ronald Reagan. Their conservatism appealed to her German belief that nature was perfect and that all the troubles in the world were caused by man. During my school hours, she worked at the Atkinson's Drugs on Federal Boulevard, and what she saw there was diseased human beings parading to the counter where she took their scripts and gave them drugs. Human beings busily poisoning themselves with cigarettes and alcohol and junk food. They weren't to be trusted, the Soviets weren't to be trusted, and she arranged her politics accordingly.

why Clelia was a conservative

—p.340 by Jonathan Franzen 3 years, 11 months ago

[...] In her disappointment with him, she idealized the truly wealthy, attributing improbable virtues to them. She'd cashed in her youth and her looks for life in a cramped three-bedroom house with a tin-pot progressive too good and kind to be divorced, and in her rage against her stupid-innocence she found better men to admire: Goldwater, Senator Charles Percy, later Ronald Reagan. Their conservatism appealed to her German belief that nature was perfect and that all the troubles in the world were caused by man. During my school hours, she worked at the Atkinson's Drugs on Federal Boulevard, and what she saw there was diseased human beings parading to the counter where she took their scripts and gave them drugs. Human beings busily poisoning themselves with cigarettes and alcohol and junk food. They weren't to be trusted, the Soviets weren't to be trusted, and she arranged her politics accordingly.

why Clelia was a conservative

—p.340 by Jonathan Franzen 3 years, 11 months ago
346

I had a sense of moral injury, of being mistaken for a worse person than I was, because I had not, in fact, materially participated in anyone's degradation. To the contrary, by stealing the magazine, I'd financially punished the bookstore for its bulk purchase of secondhand porn; I was, if anything, a virtuous recycler, and any private uses to which I then put the stolen Oui were my own business and amounted, arguably, to further punishment of the exploiters, since my reliance on stolen goods obviated any cash purchase of freshly exploitational matter, not to mention saving virgin forests from being clear-cut and pulped.

after Tom was caught with a pornographic magazine

—p.346 by Jonathan Franzen 3 years, 11 months ago

I had a sense of moral injury, of being mistaken for a worse person than I was, because I had not, in fact, materially participated in anyone's degradation. To the contrary, by stealing the magazine, I'd financially punished the bookstore for its bulk purchase of secondhand porn; I was, if anything, a virtuous recycler, and any private uses to which I then put the stolen Oui were my own business and amounted, arguably, to further punishment of the exploiters, since my reliance on stolen goods obviated any cash purchase of freshly exploitational matter, not to mention saving virgin forests from being clear-cut and pulped.

after Tom was caught with a pornographic magazine

—p.346 by Jonathan Franzen 3 years, 11 months ago
360

"What are the polls showing?" [...] "Does Arne have a chance?"

"Arne has run the most exemplary campaign the state of Colorado has ever seen," she said. [...]

"So, that's a no?" I said. "The polls aren't looking good?"

just a funny concept

inspiration for a dialogue-only chapter?

—p.360 by Jonathan Franzen 3 years, 11 months ago

"What are the polls showing?" [...] "Does Arne have a chance?"

"Arne has run the most exemplary campaign the state of Colorado has ever seen," she said. [...]

"So, that's a no?" I said. "The polls aren't looking good?"

just a funny concept

inspiration for a dialogue-only chapter?

—p.360 by Jonathan Franzen 3 years, 11 months ago
365

I said I would try to serve the truth in its full complexity. I told her about the politically polarized house I'd grown up in, my father's blind progressivism, my mother's faith in corporations, and how effectively the two of them could poke holes in each other's politics.

"I could tell your mother a thing or two about corporations," Anabel said darkly.

"But the alternative doesn't work, either. You get the Soviet Union, you get the housing projects, you get the Teamsters union. The truth is somewhere in the tension between the two sides, and that's where the journalist is supposed to live, in that tension. It's like I had to be a journalist, growing up in that house."

"[...] Start a magazine like nobody else's. Not liberal, not conservative. A magazine that pokes holes in both sides at the same time."

"The Complicator."

basically my modus operandi. though tbh the implicit characterisation of "liberal" and "conservative" as being equally valid stances that deserve equal amounts of hole-poking is problematic

—p.365 by Jonathan Franzen 3 years, 11 months ago

I said I would try to serve the truth in its full complexity. I told her about the politically polarized house I'd grown up in, my father's blind progressivism, my mother's faith in corporations, and how effectively the two of them could poke holes in each other's politics.

"I could tell your mother a thing or two about corporations," Anabel said darkly.

"But the alternative doesn't work, either. You get the Soviet Union, you get the housing projects, you get the Teamsters union. The truth is somewhere in the tension between the two sides, and that's where the journalist is supposed to live, in that tension. It's like I had to be a journalist, growing up in that house."

"[...] Start a magazine like nobody else's. Not liberal, not conservative. A magazine that pokes holes in both sides at the same time."

"The Complicator."

basically my modus operandi. though tbh the implicit characterisation of "liberal" and "conservative" as being equally valid stances that deserve equal amounts of hole-poking is problematic

—p.365 by Jonathan Franzen 3 years, 11 months ago

(noun) a staff for holding the flax, tow, or wool in spinning OR relating to women

400

uncomfortably weighted against the distaff

I assume in this case it means: weighted against the woman (i.e., Anabel)

—p.400 by Jonathan Franzen
uncertain
3 years, 11 months ago

uncomfortably weighted against the distaff

I assume in this case it means: weighted against the woman (i.e., Anabel)

—p.400 by Jonathan Franzen
uncertain
3 years, 11 months ago

(noun) an oversize wine bottle holding about three liters

401

a jeroboam of Mumm

—p.401 by Jonathan Franzen
uncertain
3 years, 11 months ago

a jeroboam of Mumm

—p.401 by Jonathan Franzen
uncertain
3 years, 11 months ago
404

[...] all we did was talk and talk, like a two-person emotional bureaucracy. The smallest of questions ("Why did you wait ten minutes to tell me your good news instead of telling me immediately?") triggered a full formal investigation, with every response filed in triplicate and the review period extended and re-extended while the archives were searched.

I just really like this section and the way Tom describes the relationship (it's insightful and clever)

—p.404 by Jonathan Franzen 3 years, 11 months ago

[...] all we did was talk and talk, like a two-person emotional bureaucracy. The smallest of questions ("Why did you wait ten minutes to tell me your good news instead of telling me immediately?") triggered a full formal investigation, with every response filed in triplicate and the review period extended and re-extended while the archives were searched.

I just really like this section and the way Tom describes the relationship (it's insightful and clever)

—p.404 by Jonathan Franzen 3 years, 11 months ago
406

We returned to New York determined to make our own Sicilian-style spaghetti with fried eggplant and tomatoes, a dish so delicious that we wanted to eat it twice a week. Which we did, for several months. And here was the thing: I didn't get sick of it slowly. I got sick of it suddenly, radically, and permanently while eating a plateful whose first bites I'd enjoyed as much as ever. I set down my fork and said we needed a break from fried eggplant and tomatoes. The dish was perfect and delicious and not to blame. I'd made it poison to me by eating too much of it. And so we took a monthlong break from it, but Anabel still loved it, and one very warm evening in June I came home and smelled her cooking it.

My stomach heaved.

"We overdid it," I said from the kitchen doorway. "I can't sand it anymore."

Symbolism was never lost on Anabel. "I'm not spaghetti with eggplant, Tom."

—p.406 by Jonathan Franzen 3 years, 11 months ago

We returned to New York determined to make our own Sicilian-style spaghetti with fried eggplant and tomatoes, a dish so delicious that we wanted to eat it twice a week. Which we did, for several months. And here was the thing: I didn't get sick of it slowly. I got sick of it suddenly, radically, and permanently while eating a plateful whose first bites I'd enjoyed as much as ever. I set down my fork and said we needed a break from fried eggplant and tomatoes. The dish was perfect and delicious and not to blame. I'd made it poison to me by eating too much of it. And so we took a monthlong break from it, but Anabel still loved it, and one very warm evening in June I came home and smelled her cooking it.

My stomach heaved.

"We overdid it," I said from the kitchen doorway. "I can't sand it anymore."

Symbolism was never lost on Anabel. "I'm not spaghetti with eggplant, Tom."

—p.406 by Jonathan Franzen 3 years, 11 months ago

atone for (guilt or sin)

414

remained behind to expiate the country's collective guilt

—p.414 by Jonathan Franzen
confirm
3 years, 11 months ago

remained behind to expiate the country's collective guilt

—p.414 by Jonathan Franzen
confirm
3 years, 11 months ago

the partially shaded outer region of the shadow cast by an opaque object

426

I was still in a penumbra of inurement to death

—p.426 by Jonathan Franzen
confirm
3 years, 11 months ago

I was still in a penumbra of inurement to death

—p.426 by Jonathan Franzen
confirm
3 years, 11 months ago

accustomed to something, especially something unpleasant

426

I was still in a penumbra of inurement to death

—p.426 by Jonathan Franzen
notable
3 years, 11 months ago

I was still in a penumbra of inurement to death

—p.426 by Jonathan Franzen
notable
3 years, 11 months ago

(adjective) of little or no consequence; trifling inconsequential / (adjective) having no force; inoperative

442

the trustee's responsibilities are nugatory

—p.442 by Jonathan Franzen
confirm
3 years, 11 months ago

the trustee's responsibilities are nugatory

—p.442 by Jonathan Franzen
confirm
3 years, 11 months ago