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244

Conclusion

In Line for the Cash Register with Wallace

1
terms
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notes

Severs, J. (2017). Conclusion. In Severs, J. David Foster Wallace's Balancing Books: Fictions of Value. Columbia University Press, pp. 244-303

(verb) to delay or be tardy in acting or doing / (verb) to linger in expectation; wait / (verb) to abide or stay in or at a place

244

He updates the Sartrean trope of endless tarrying in hell by moving it to the marketplace

—p.244 by Jeffrey Severs
confirm
3 years, 4 months ago

He updates the Sartrean trope of endless tarrying in hell by moving it to the marketplace

—p.244 by Jeffrey Severs
confirm
3 years, 4 months ago
245

[...] Neither is Wallace exceedingly interested in commodities' production, the class structure that leads to them, and all the elements of the Marxist critique underlying so much of U.S. postmodernism. His bounty is different.

good to know

—p.245 by Jeffrey Severs 3 years, 4 months ago

[...] Neither is Wallace exceedingly interested in commodities' production, the class structure that leads to them, and all the elements of the Marxist critique underlying so much of U.S. postmodernism. His bounty is different.

good to know

—p.245 by Jeffrey Severs 3 years, 4 months ago
251

[...] some of the attractiveness of Wallace's difficult works to an Occupy generation should be attributed to his understanding of the dire emotional consequences of a cultural environment in which value has been emptied out and financialization made ascendant, a world in which the most plentiful riches ever somehow produce dissatisfaction and perceived scarcity, not to mention unconscionable class stratification. Has Bernie Sander's presidential candidacy marked a resurgence of New Deal values for a new generation of liberalism? Wallace might have shown us the answer.

alas

—p.251 by Jeffrey Severs 3 years, 4 months ago

[...] some of the attractiveness of Wallace's difficult works to an Occupy generation should be attributed to his understanding of the dire emotional consequences of a cultural environment in which value has been emptied out and financialization made ascendant, a world in which the most plentiful riches ever somehow produce dissatisfaction and perceived scarcity, not to mention unconscionable class stratification. Has Bernie Sander's presidential candidacy marked a resurgence of New Deal values for a new generation of liberalism? Wallace might have shown us the answer.

alas

—p.251 by Jeffrey Severs 3 years, 4 months ago