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13

Changing the World: From Praxis to Production

5
terms
2
notes

Balibar, É. (2017). Changing the World: From Praxis to Production. In Balibar, É. The Philosophy of Marx. Verso, pp. 13-41

13

In the eleventh and last of the Theses on Feuerbach, we read: ‘The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways; the point is to change it.’ [...]

the famous quote

—p.13 by Étienne Balibar 5 years ago

In the eleventh and last of the Theses on Feuerbach, we read: ‘The philosophers have only interpreted the world, in various ways; the point is to change it.’ [...]

the famous quote

—p.13 by Étienne Balibar 5 years ago

relating to stone and gems and the work involved in engraving, cutting, or polishing

13

A series of aphorisms that here outline a critical argument, there advance a lapidary proposition and what is, at times, almost a slogan.

—p.13 by Étienne Balibar
notable
5 years ago

A series of aphorisms that here outline a critical argument, there advance a lapidary proposition and what is, at times, almost a slogan.

—p.13 by Étienne Balibar
notable
5 years ago

(noun) the scope, extent, or bounds of something

17

lapse back into the ambit of philosophy, since there is no third way between philosophy and revolution

—p.17 by Étienne Balibar
confirm
5 years ago

lapse back into the ambit of philosophy, since there is no third way between philosophy and revolution

—p.17 by Étienne Balibar
confirm
5 years ago

used to express a conclusion for which there is stronger evidence than for a previously accepted one

18

as early as the Manifesto and, a fortiori, in Capital, he was to note the power with which capitalism ‘changes the world

—p.18 by Étienne Balibar
notable
5 years ago

as early as the Manifesto and, a fortiori, in Capital, he was to note the power with which capitalism ‘changes the world

—p.18 by Étienne Balibar
notable
5 years ago
21

[...] (1) that the conditions of existence of the proletarians (what we would today term social exclusion) are in contradiction with all the principles of that society; (2) that they themselves live by other values than those of private property, profit, patriotism and bourgeois individualism; and (3) that their growing opposition to the State and the dominant class is a necessary effect of the modern social structure, but one which will soon prove lethal for that structure.

Marx on the proletariat

—p.21 by Étienne Balibar 5 years ago

[...] (1) that the conditions of existence of the proletarians (what we would today term social exclusion) are in contradiction with all the principles of that society; (2) that they themselves live by other values than those of private property, profit, patriotism and bourgeois individualism; and (3) that their growing opposition to the State and the dominant class is a necessary effect of the modern social structure, but one which will soon prove lethal for that structure.

Marx on the proletariat

—p.21 by Étienne Balibar 5 years ago

an extremely confused, complicated, or embarrassing situation

23

They must explain this paradox, which also leads them to point up the imbroglio that arises from it

—p.23 by Étienne Balibar
notable
5 years ago

They must explain this paradox, which also leads them to point up the imbroglio that arises from it

—p.23 by Étienne Balibar
notable
5 years ago

(noun) ; action practice; as / (noun) exercise or practice of an art, science, or skill / (noun) customary practice or conduct / (noun) practical application of a theory

40

Since the Greeks (who made it the privilege of ‘citizens’, i.e. of the masters), praxis had been that ‘free’ action in which man realizes and transforms only himself, seeking to attain his own perfection.

—p.40 by Étienne Balibar
notable
5 years ago

Since the Greeks (who made it the privilege of ‘citizens’, i.e. of the masters), praxis had been that ‘free’ action in which man realizes and transforms only himself, seeking to attain his own perfection.

—p.40 by Étienne Balibar
notable
5 years ago