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111

Ever greater impact, ever less benefit: high-tech capital's mysterious lack of growth

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Hughes, B. (2016). Ever greater impact, ever less benefit: high-tech capital's mysterious lack of growth. In Hughes, B. The Bleeding Edge: Why Technology Turns Toxic in an Unequal World. New Internationalist, pp. 111-122

in conservation or energy economics: the reduction in expected gains from new technologies that increase the efficiency of resource use, because of behavioral or other systemic responses (aka the Jevons Paradox; named after William Stanley Jevons, who studied the consumption of coal after steam engines were made more efficient in 1865)

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the 'Jevons Paradox' (often known nowadays as the 'rebound effect') has been observed again and again with every subsequent major technology

—p.111 by Bob Hughes
notable
2 years, 11 months ago

the 'Jevons Paradox' (often known nowadays as the 'rebound effect') has been observed again and again with every subsequent major technology

—p.111 by Bob Hughes
notable
2 years, 11 months ago

the hypothesis that as an economy develops, market forces first increase and then decrease economic inequality. The hypothesis was first advanced by economist Simon Kuznets in the 1950s and '60s. Highly contested

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Kuznets hoped that inequality would fall; he originally regarded his theory as 'perhaps 5 per cent empirical information and 95 per cent speculation, some of it possibly tainted by wishful thinking', but it was so enthusiastically received that he shed his doubts and the 'Kuznets Curve' soon gained the status of a natural law.

—p.113 by Bob Hughes
notable
2 years, 11 months ago

Kuznets hoped that inequality would fall; he originally regarded his theory as 'perhaps 5 per cent empirical information and 95 per cent speculation, some of it possibly tainted by wishful thinking', but it was so enthusiastically received that he shed his doubts and the 'Kuznets Curve' soon gained the status of a natural law.

—p.113 by Bob Hughes
notable
2 years, 11 months ago

aka the productivity paradox. defined as a perceived "discrepancy between measures of investment in information technology and measures of output at the national level"

117

In 1987, Robert Solow stated that 'we can see the computer age everywhere but in the productivity statistics'. Henceforth, this was known as 'Solow's paradox'.

—p.117 by Bob Hughes
notable
2 years, 11 months ago

In 1987, Robert Solow stated that 'we can see the computer age everywhere but in the productivity statistics'. Henceforth, this was known as 'Solow's paradox'.

—p.117 by Bob Hughes
notable
2 years, 11 months ago

(adjective) stubbornly persistent in wrongdoing / (adjective) hardened in feelings / (adjective) resistant to persuasion or softening influences

120

The human mind's obdurate tendency to overconfidence becomes a major liability for humanity when the decision-making is delegated to tiny numbers of highly privileged minds.

—p.120 by Bob Hughes
notable
2 years, 11 months ago

The human mind's obdurate tendency to overconfidence becomes a major liability for humanity when the decision-making is delegated to tiny numbers of highly privileged minds.

—p.120 by Bob Hughes
notable
2 years, 11 months ago