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351

Part VII: Back from the Abyss--Habermas and Critical Theory after the 1960s

3
terms
1
notes

Jeffries, S. (2016). Part VII: Back from the Abyss--Habermas and Critical Theory after the 1960s. In Jeffries, S. Grand Hotel Abyss: The Lives of the Frankfurt School. Verso, pp. 351-439

(noun) a painkilling drug or medicine

362

That sounds anodyne, but

—p.362 by Stuart Jeffries
notable
5 years, 3 months ago

That sounds anodyne, but

—p.362 by Stuart Jeffries
notable
5 years, 3 months ago

(noun) defensive wall

369

For it is in the lifeworld that Habermas finds the potential bulwarks against the evisceration of social life by capitalism, state and what his colleague Marcuse called one-dimensional society

the public sphere

—p.369 by Stuart Jeffries
notable
5 years, 3 months ago

For it is in the lifeworld that Habermas finds the potential bulwarks against the evisceration of social life by capitalism, state and what his colleague Marcuse called one-dimensional society

the public sphere

—p.369 by Stuart Jeffries
notable
5 years, 3 months ago

(noun) an expression of real or pretended doubt or uncertainty especially for rhetorical effect / (noun) a logical impasse or contradiction / (noun) a radical contradiction in the import of a text or theory that is seen in deconstruction as inevitable

380

he had found at the centre of his intellectual web what critical theorists virtuosically discovered in other thinkers’ theories, namely an aporia (a word taken from the Greek for ‘no passage’, and often signifying perplexity).

on Habermas

—p.380 by Stuart Jeffries
confirm
5 years, 3 months ago

he had found at the centre of his intellectual web what critical theorists virtuosically discovered in other thinkers’ theories, namely an aporia (a word taken from the Greek for ‘no passage’, and often signifying perplexity).

on Habermas

—p.380 by Stuart Jeffries
confirm
5 years, 3 months ago
388

Grown-ups buy line-caught salmon, they don’t read Dialectic of Enlightenment. History has stopped and we live, don’t we, in the best of all possible worlds? In that best of all possible worlds, at the end of history, wrote Fredric Jameson in Late Marxism (1990), ‘the question about poetry after Auschwitz has been replaced with that of whether you could bear to read Adorno and Horkheimer next to the pool’. [...]

referencing a scene from Franzen's The Corrections

—p.388 by Stuart Jeffries 5 years, 3 months ago

Grown-ups buy line-caught salmon, they don’t read Dialectic of Enlightenment. History has stopped and we live, don’t we, in the best of all possible worlds? In that best of all possible worlds, at the end of history, wrote Fredric Jameson in Late Marxism (1990), ‘the question about poetry after Auschwitz has been replaced with that of whether you could bear to read Adorno and Horkheimer next to the pool’. [...]

referencing a scene from Franzen's The Corrections

—p.388 by Stuart Jeffries 5 years, 3 months ago