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259

Part V: The 1950s

3
terms
2
notes

Jeffries, S. (2016). Part V: The 1950s. In Jeffries, S. Grand Hotel Abyss: The Lives of the Frankfurt School. Verso, pp. 259-300

265

That was one of the problems with the Germany to which he and Horkheimer returned: there were no Nazis any more. The returning exiles found their homeland in a state of mass denial. When Horkheimer visited Frankfurt in 1948 to discuss with the university authorities the possibility of re-establishing the Institute for Social Research, he found his former colleagues ‘as sweet as pie, smooth as eels and hypocritical … I attended a faculty meeting yesterday and found it too friendly by half and enough to make you want to throw up. All these people sit there as they did before the Third Reich … just as if nothing had happened … they are acting out a Ghost Sonata that leaves Strindberg standing.'

—p.265 by Stuart Jeffries 2 years, 10 months ago

That was one of the problems with the Germany to which he and Horkheimer returned: there were no Nazis any more. The returning exiles found their homeland in a state of mass denial. When Horkheimer visited Frankfurt in 1948 to discuss with the university authorities the possibility of re-establishing the Institute for Social Research, he found his former colleagues ‘as sweet as pie, smooth as eels and hypocritical … I attended a faculty meeting yesterday and found it too friendly by half and enough to make you want to throw up. All these people sit there as they did before the Third Reich … just as if nothing had happened … they are acting out a Ghost Sonata that leaves Strindberg standing.'

—p.265 by Stuart Jeffries 2 years, 10 months ago
268

After the war, Habermas enrolled at the University of Bonn, later also studying philosophy at Göttingen and Zurich. Between 1949 and 1953, he spent four years studying Heidegger, so his letter to the philosopher was freighted with symbolic resonances. A young intellectual was calling out his older mentor, demanding that he not hide in silence but rather explain how he could have eulogised a politically criminal system. A new German generation was calling on an older one to account for itself, and perhaps atone for its sins

—p.268 by Stuart Jeffries 2 years, 10 months ago

After the war, Habermas enrolled at the University of Bonn, later also studying philosophy at Göttingen and Zurich. Between 1949 and 1953, he spent four years studying Heidegger, so his letter to the philosopher was freighted with symbolic resonances. A young intellectual was calling out his older mentor, demanding that he not hide in silence but rather explain how he could have eulogised a politically criminal system. A new German generation was calling on an older one to account for itself, and perhaps atone for its sins

—p.268 by Stuart Jeffries 2 years, 10 months ago

(noun) an ultimate end (from Greek)

268

For Habermas, the inherent aim or telos of language was to reach understanding and bring about consensus

—p.268 by Stuart Jeffries
notable
2 years, 10 months ago

For Habermas, the inherent aim or telos of language was to reach understanding and bring about consensus

—p.268 by Stuart Jeffries
notable
2 years, 10 months ago

(noun) a change or variation occurring in the course of something; successive, alternating, or changing phases or conditions, as of life or fortune; ups and downs

295

as though love were a full comprehensive insurance policy that could protect both parties from the vicissitudes of the real world of loss and disappointment

Fromm writing about marriage (after his wife died)

—p.295 by Stuart Jeffries
notable
2 years, 10 months ago

as though love were a full comprehensive insurance policy that could protect both parties from the vicissitudes of the real world of loss and disappointment

Fromm writing about marriage (after his wife died)

—p.295 by Stuart Jeffries
notable
2 years, 10 months ago

(noun) a vote by which the people of an entire country or district express an opinion for or against a proposal especially on a choice of government or ruler

298

Habermas argued that the protests were against ‘the statesmen ruling in our name’ and called for a plebiscite on the army being equipped with nuclear weapons

—p.298 by Stuart Jeffries
notable
2 years, 10 months ago

Habermas argued that the protests were against ‘the statesmen ruling in our name’ and called for a plebiscite on the army being equipped with nuclear weapons

—p.298 by Stuart Jeffries
notable
2 years, 10 months ago