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23

From Class to Special Interest

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terms
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notes

comparing unions US (worse) and Canada (less bad). kind of tuned out here

Eidlin, B. (2016). From Class to Special Interest. In , J. Rank and File. None, pp. 23-32

23

Writing in the Washington Post last September, the unimpeachably mainstream economist Larry Summers proclaimed, “We ... know that stronger unions are not just good for their members, they are good for our country and our descendants. Strengthening collective worker voice has to be an important component of any realistic American inclusive growth agenda.”

great quote coming from someone like Larry Summers

—p.23 by Barry Eidlin 2 years, 10 months ago

Writing in the Washington Post last September, the unimpeachably mainstream economist Larry Summers proclaimed, “We ... know that stronger unions are not just good for their members, they are good for our country and our descendants. Strengthening collective worker voice has to be an important component of any realistic American inclusive growth agenda.”

great quote coming from someone like Larry Summers

—p.23 by Barry Eidlin 2 years, 10 months ago

aka the National Labor Relations Act of 1935; a foundational statute of US labor law which guarantees basic rights of private sector employees to organize into trade unions, engage in collective bargaining for better terms and conditions at work, and take collective action including strike if necessary

26

While President Roosevelt and his New Deal administration quickly responded to labor unrest with legislative reforms like the 1933 National Industrial Recovery Act and the 1935 National Labor Relations Act (also known as the Wagner Act), successive Canadian governments steadfastly rebuffed labor’s demands.

—p.26 by Barry Eidlin
notable
2 years, 10 months ago

While President Roosevelt and his New Deal administration quickly responded to labor unrest with legislative reforms like the 1933 National Industrial Recovery Act and the 1935 National Labor Relations Act (also known as the Wagner Act), successive Canadian governments steadfastly rebuffed labor’s demands.

—p.26 by Barry Eidlin
notable
2 years, 10 months ago