Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

15

Chapter 2

"The Real 'Waller'"

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terms
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notes

his time at Amherst. good grades despite lots of pot. roomed with Costello sophomore year. things start to go wrong in Jan and he goes back home. starts writing fiction. at the same time, his parents' relationship starts to decay. back at Amherst in the fall: plunges into philosophy; revives the campus humor magazine Sabrina with Costello, which earns him a small circle of admirers (they'd talk about Wittgenstein, politics, mathematical logic, hot girls, etc). read a lot of books over the summer at his parents' house. writes Planet Trillaphon. starts a creative writing class. decides to outdo Costello (who had graduated double summa) and works on both Broom and his Taylor rebuttal

Max, D. (2012). Chapter 2. In Max, D. Every Love Story Is a Ghost Story: A Life of David Foster Wallace. Viking, pp. 15-49

26

[...] In Sabrina, he wrote an advice column caled "Ask Bill," in which readers were invited to bring their questions to Professor Kennick. Bertrand Russell wrote in to reveal his crush on Alfred North Whitehead and ask what he should do. "Any relationship that depends for its security on the proposition that monistic atomism has any relevance to post-Enlightenment conceptions of phenomenological reality is not worth saving," the Sabrina Kennick sternly replied. Most stories were collaborations, but Wallace revived his childhood love of Hardy Boys mysteries to write "The Sabrina Brothers in the Case of the Hung Hamster" himself:

Suddenly a sinister, twin-engined airplane came into view, sputtering and back-firing. It lost power and began spinning in toward the hill. It was heading right for the Sabrina brothers! Luckily at the last minute the plane ceased to exist. "Crikey!" exclaimed Joe. "It's a good thing we're characters in a highly implausible children's book or we'd be goners!"

Wallace writing for the campus humour magazine, which he revived with Mark Costello

—p.26 by D.T. Max 1 year, 8 months ago

[...] In Sabrina, he wrote an advice column caled "Ask Bill," in which readers were invited to bring their questions to Professor Kennick. Bertrand Russell wrote in to reveal his crush on Alfred North Whitehead and ask what he should do. "Any relationship that depends for its security on the proposition that monistic atomism has any relevance to post-Enlightenment conceptions of phenomenological reality is not worth saving," the Sabrina Kennick sternly replied. Most stories were collaborations, but Wallace revived his childhood love of Hardy Boys mysteries to write "The Sabrina Brothers in the Case of the Hung Hamster" himself:

Suddenly a sinister, twin-engined airplane came into view, sputtering and back-firing. It lost power and began spinning in toward the hill. It was heading right for the Sabrina brothers! Luckily at the last minute the plane ceased to exist. "Crikey!" exclaimed Joe. "It's a good thing we're characters in a highly implausible children's book or we'd be goners!"

Wallace writing for the campus humour magazine, which he revived with Mark Costello

—p.26 by D.T. Max 1 year, 8 months ago

a confused mixture

47

the farrago of forms

—p.47 by D.T. Max
unknown
1 year, 9 months ago

the farrago of forms

—p.47 by D.T. Max
unknown
1 year, 9 months ago