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64

Edmund Wilson

11
terms
1
notes

Wood, J. (2012). Edmund Wilson. In Wood, J. The Fun Stuff: And Other Essays. Farrar, Straus and Giroux, pp. 64-88

(from the Greek for "to lead out") a critical explanation or interpretation of a text, particularly a religious text

67

his own prose, built of solid blocks of exegesis and description

—p.67 by James Wood
notable
3 years, 7 months ago

his own prose, built of solid blocks of exegesis and description

—p.67 by James Wood
notable
3 years, 7 months ago

(adjective) being or presenting a comprehensive or panoramic view

67

He seems to rear panoptically above his subjects

—p.67 by James Wood
notable
3 years, 7 months ago

He seems to rear panoptically above his subjects

—p.67 by James Wood
notable
3 years, 7 months ago

(adjective) affording a general view of a whole / (adjective) manifesting or characterized by comprehensiveness or breadth of view / (adjective) presenting or taking the same or common view

69

a rather synoptic voraciousness

—p.69 by James Wood
notable
3 years, 7 months ago

a rather synoptic voraciousness

—p.69 by James Wood
notable
3 years, 7 months ago

calmness and composure, especially in a difficult situation

73

he rather strangely praised Henry James for 'his classical equanimity [...]'

on Edmund Wilson

—p.73 by James Wood
notable
3 years, 7 months ago

he rather strangely praised Henry James for 'his classical equanimity [...]'

on Edmund Wilson

—p.73 by James Wood
notable
3 years, 7 months ago

(noun) proof / (noun) an act of approving formally or officially / (noun) commendation, praise

74

I am guilty of its every stricture and I take an extraordinary delight in its considered approbation

quoting F. Scott Fitzgerald

—p.74 by James Wood
notable
3 years, 7 months ago

I am guilty of its every stricture and I take an extraordinary delight in its considered approbation

quoting F. Scott Fitzgerald

—p.74 by James Wood
notable
3 years, 7 months ago

a French symbolic poet and critic in the 19th century

74

this would enable him to trace a line from the aestheticism of Mallarmé and Villiers de l'Isle-Adam to Proust

—p.74 by James Wood
notable
3 years, 7 months ago

this would enable him to trace a line from the aestheticism of Mallarmé and Villiers de l'Isle-Adam to Proust

—p.74 by James Wood
notable
3 years, 7 months ago
77

Wilson could see that it was psychologically credulous of Marx to believe that when the proletariat took over it would simply be on its best behaviour. What was the evidence for this? Why would the worker not want what the capitalist plutocrat had? [...]

[...]

But Rousseau's speculative theology of the fall of man only forces the very question that Wilson cannot face in Marx. If man was once good, in his state of nature, and is now bad, i his state of society, how exactly did he begin to corrupt. Did he become bad because human nature is corrupt, or because society corrupted his goodness? If the latter, what is the hope for a utopian restoration of man? How do we get back--or back and forward at once--to the ideal state of man? Likewise, did the revolution of 1917 go bad because corrupt huma nature cannot be trusted with revolutionary despotism, or because violent revolution is at its heart a corrupt idea? And if the answer to either question is yes, the question fudged by Rousseau returns: how do we reach utopia ; how do we--in Rousseau's terms--restore what has been lost?

on To The Finland Station, which seems very much worth reading

—p.77 by James Wood 3 years, 7 months ago

Wilson could see that it was psychologically credulous of Marx to believe that when the proletariat took over it would simply be on its best behaviour. What was the evidence for this? Why would the worker not want what the capitalist plutocrat had? [...]

[...]

But Rousseau's speculative theology of the fall of man only forces the very question that Wilson cannot face in Marx. If man was once good, in his state of nature, and is now bad, i his state of society, how exactly did he begin to corrupt. Did he become bad because human nature is corrupt, or because society corrupted his goodness? If the latter, what is the hope for a utopian restoration of man? How do we get back--or back and forward at once--to the ideal state of man? Likewise, did the revolution of 1917 go bad because corrupt huma nature cannot be trusted with revolutionary despotism, or because violent revolution is at its heart a corrupt idea? And if the answer to either question is yes, the question fudged by Rousseau returns: how do we reach utopia ; how do we--in Rousseau's terms--restore what has been lost?

on To The Finland Station, which seems very much worth reading

—p.77 by James Wood 3 years, 7 months ago

(adjective) marked with small spots or patches contrasting with the background

80

leave them in a dapple of ambiguity rather than drag them out into any prematurely decisive light of judgment

beautiful

—p.80 by James Wood
notable
3 years, 7 months ago

leave them in a dapple of ambiguity rather than drag them out into any prematurely decisive light of judgment

beautiful

—p.80 by James Wood
notable
3 years, 7 months ago

atone for (guilt or sin)

80

his passionate and expiatory nature

quoting Edmund Wilson

—p.80 missing author
notable
3 years, 7 months ago

his passionate and expiatory nature

quoting Edmund Wilson

—p.80 missing author
notable
3 years, 7 months ago

(noun) a fancy word for boxer

82

this pugilistic confidence is surely misplaced

never really knew what this word meant even though I've definitely seen it before

—p.82 by James Wood
uncertain
3 years, 7 months ago

this pugilistic confidence is surely misplaced

never really knew what this word meant even though I've definitely seen it before

—p.82 by James Wood
uncertain
3 years, 7 months ago

(verb) to wear off the skin of; abrade / (verb) to censure scathingly

83

unlike the poorer stories, which are lovingly excoriated

—p.83 by James Wood
notable
3 years, 7 months ago

unlike the poorer stories, which are lovingly excoriated

—p.83 by James Wood
notable
3 years, 7 months ago

arranged (scales, sepals, plates, etc.) so that they overlap like roof tiles

87

Lionel Trilling imbricates ideas and aesthetics with greater skill

—p.87 by James Wood
notable
3 years, 7 months ago

Lionel Trilling imbricates ideas and aesthetics with greater skill

—p.87 by James Wood
notable
3 years, 7 months ago