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This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading.

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1

Introduction

2
terms
2
notes

Williams, A. and Srnicek, N. (2016). Introduction. In Williams, A. and Srnicek, N. Inventing the Future: Postcapitalism and a World Without Work. Verso, pp. 1-4

2

[...] All around us, it seems that the political systems, movements and processes that dominated the last hundred years are no longer able to bring about genuinely transformative change. Instead, they have forced us onto an endless treadmill of misery. Electoral democracy lies in remarkable disrepair. Centre-left political parties have been hollowed out and sapped of any popular mandate. Their corpses stumble on as vehicles for careerist ambitions. [...]

I just really like the last sentence

—p.2 by Alex Williams, Nick Srnicek 2 years, 2 months ago

[...] All around us, it seems that the political systems, movements and processes that dominated the last hundred years are no longer able to bring about genuinely transformative change. Instead, they have forced us onto an endless treadmill of misery. Electoral democracy lies in remarkable disrepair. Centre-left political parties have been hollowed out and sapped of any popular mandate. Their corpses stumble on as vehicles for careerist ambitions. [...]

I just really like the last sentence

—p.2 by Alex Williams, Nick Srnicek 2 years, 2 months ago
2

Yet, for all the glossy sheen of our technological era, we remain bound by an old and obsolete set of social relations. We continue to work long hours, commuting further, to perform tasks that feel increasingly meaningless. Our jobs have become more insecure, our pay has stagnated, and our debt has become overwhelming. We struggle to make ends meet, to put food on the table, to pay the rent or mortgage, and as we shuffle from job to job, we reminisce about pensions and struggle to find affordable childcare. Automation renders us unemployed and stagnant wages devastate the middle class, while corporate profits surge to new heights. The glimmers of a better future are trampled and forgotten under the pressures of an increasingly precarious and demanding world. And each day, we return to work as normal: exhausted, anxious, stressed and frustrated.

—p.2 by Alex Williams, Nick Srnicek 2 years, 2 months ago

Yet, for all the glossy sheen of our technological era, we remain bound by an old and obsolete set of social relations. We continue to work long hours, commuting further, to perform tasks that feel increasingly meaningless. Our jobs have become more insecure, our pay has stagnated, and our debt has become overwhelming. We struggle to make ends meet, to put food on the table, to pay the rent or mortgage, and as we shuffle from job to job, we reminisce about pensions and struggle to find affordable childcare. Automation renders us unemployed and stagnant wages devastate the middle class, while corporate profits surge to new heights. The glimmers of a better future are trampled and forgotten under the pressures of an increasingly precarious and demanding world. And each day, we return to work as normal: exhausted, anxious, stressed and frustrated.

—p.2 by Alex Williams, Nick Srnicek 2 years, 2 months ago

the postulate that markets are organised most effectively by private enterprise and that the private pursuit of accumulation will generate the most common good; accomplished by opening international markets and financial networks, and downsizing the welfare state

3

Neoliberalism has failed, social democracy is impossible, and only an alternative vision can bring about universal prosperity and emancipation.

—p.3 by Alex Williams, Nick Srnicek
notable
2 years, 2 months ago

Neoliberalism has failed, social democracy is impossible, and only an alternative vision can bring about universal prosperity and emancipation.

—p.3 by Alex Williams, Nick Srnicek
notable
2 years, 2 months ago

relating to a church parish; having a limited or narrow outlook or scope

3

The utopian potentials inherent in twenty-first-century technology cannot remain bound to a parochial capitalist imagination; they must be liberated by an ambitious left alternative.

—p.3 by Alex Williams, Nick Srnicek
notable
2 years, 2 months ago

The utopian potentials inherent in twenty-first-century technology cannot remain bound to a parochial capitalist imagination; they must be liberated by an ambitious left alternative.

—p.3 by Alex Williams, Nick Srnicek
notable
2 years, 2 months ago