Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

2

[...] there is much that is debatable, and a little that is frankly silly, in Adorno's work [...]

—p.2 Introduction: Adorno and Authoritarian Irrationalism (1) by Stephen Crook 9 months, 3 weeks ago

[...] there is much that is debatable, and a little that is frankly silly, in Adorno's work [...]

—p.2 Introduction: Adorno and Authoritarian Irrationalism (1) by Stephen Crook 9 months, 3 weeks ago
48

[...] the occult appears rather institutionalized, objectified and, to a large extent, socialized [...]

—p.48 The Stars Down to Earth: The Los Angeles Times Astrology Column (46) by Theodor W. Adorno 9 months, 3 weeks ago

[...] the occult appears rather institutionalized, objectified and, to a large extent, socialized [...]

—p.48 The Stars Down to Earth: The Los Angeles Times Astrology Column (46) by Theodor W. Adorno 9 months, 3 weeks ago
49

[...] The type of people we are concerned with take astrology for granted, much like psychiatry, symphony concerts or political parties; they accept it because it exists, without much reflection, provided only that their own psychological demands somehow correspond to the offer. They are hardly interested in the justification of the system. In the newspaper column to which this monograph is mainly devoted the mechanics of the astrological system are never divulged and the readers are presented only with the alleged results of astrological reasoning in which the reader does not actively participate.

—p.49 The Stars Down to Earth: The Los Angeles Times Astrology Column (46) by Theodor W. Adorno 9 months, 3 weeks ago

[...] The type of people we are concerned with take astrology for granted, much like psychiatry, symphony concerts or political parties; they accept it because it exists, without much reflection, provided only that their own psychological demands somehow correspond to the offer. They are hardly interested in the justification of the system. In the newspaper column to which this monograph is mainly devoted the mechanics of the astrological system are never divulged and the readers are presented only with the alleged results of astrological reasoning in which the reader does not actively participate.

—p.49 The Stars Down to Earth: The Los Angeles Times Astrology Column (46) by Theodor W. Adorno 9 months, 3 weeks ago
51

[...] People always wanted to learn from occult signs what to expect and do; in fact, superstition is largely a residue of animistic magical practices by which ancient humanity tried to influence or control the course of events. But the sobriety, nay the overrealism, of our material at the expense of anything remotely reminiscent of the supranatural seems to be one of its most paradoxical and challenging features. Overrealism in itself may be, in some directions, irrational, in the sense of that overdeveloped and self-destructive shrewdness of self interest, pointed out before. In addition it will be proved during the course of our study that astrological irrationality has largely been reduced to a purely formal characteristic: abstract authority.

—p.51 The Stars Down to Earth: The Los Angeles Times Astrology Column (46) by Theodor W. Adorno 9 months, 3 weeks ago

[...] People always wanted to learn from occult signs what to expect and do; in fact, superstition is largely a residue of animistic magical practices by which ancient humanity tried to influence or control the course of events. But the sobriety, nay the overrealism, of our material at the expense of anything remotely reminiscent of the supranatural seems to be one of its most paradoxical and challenging features. Overrealism in itself may be, in some directions, irrational, in the sense of that overdeveloped and self-destructive shrewdness of self interest, pointed out before. In addition it will be proved during the course of our study that astrological irrationality has largely been reduced to a purely formal characteristic: abstract authority.

—p.51 The Stars Down to Earth: The Los Angeles Times Astrology Column (46) by Theodor W. Adorno 9 months, 3 weeks ago
56

[...] Hardly ever does the practical advice tendered to the reader transgress the limits of what one finds in any column dealing with human relations and popular psychology. The only difference is that the writer leans on his distinctly magical and irrational authority which seems to be strangely out of proportion with the common-sense content of what he has to offer. This discrepancy cannot be regarded as accidental. [...]

—p.56 The Stars Down to Earth: The Los Angeles Times Astrology Column (46) by Theodor W. Adorno 9 months, 3 weeks ago

[...] Hardly ever does the practical advice tendered to the reader transgress the limits of what one finds in any column dealing with human relations and popular psychology. The only difference is that the writer leans on his distinctly magical and irrational authority which seems to be strangely out of proportion with the common-sense content of what he has to offer. This discrepancy cannot be regarded as accidental. [...]

—p.56 The Stars Down to Earth: The Los Angeles Times Astrology Column (46) by Theodor W. Adorno 9 months, 3 weeks ago
92

[...] The fact that one cannot countenance two contradictory desires at the same time, that, as it is loosely called, one cannot have one’s cake and eat it too, induces the advice that irreconcilable activities simply should be undertaken at various times indicated by celestial configurations. This again feeds on realistic elements: the order of everyday life takes care of a number of antinomies of existence, such as that of work and leisure or of public functions and private existence. Such antinomies are taken up by the column, hypostatized and treated as though they were simple dichotomies of the natural order of things rather than sociologically conditioned patterns. Everything can be solved, so runs the implicit argument, if one only chooses the right time, and if one fails, this is merely due to a lack of understanding of some supposedly cosmic rhythm. [...]

bi-phasic approach section

—p.92 The Stars Down to Earth: The Los Angeles Times Astrology Column (46) by Theodor W. Adorno 9 months, 3 weeks ago

[...] The fact that one cannot countenance two contradictory desires at the same time, that, as it is loosely called, one cannot have one’s cake and eat it too, induces the advice that irreconcilable activities simply should be undertaken at various times indicated by celestial configurations. This again feeds on realistic elements: the order of everyday life takes care of a number of antinomies of existence, such as that of work and leisure or of public functions and private existence. Such antinomies are taken up by the column, hypostatized and treated as though they were simple dichotomies of the natural order of things rather than sociologically conditioned patterns. Everything can be solved, so runs the implicit argument, if one only chooses the right time, and if one fails, this is merely due to a lack of understanding of some supposedly cosmic rhythm. [...]

bi-phasic approach section

—p.92 The Stars Down to Earth: The Los Angeles Times Astrology Column (46) by Theodor W. Adorno 9 months, 3 weeks ago
94

By dichotomies of this kind a pseudo-solution of difficulties is achieved: either–or relationships are transformed into first–next relationships. Pleasure thus becomes the award of work, work the atonement for pleasure.

—p.94 The Stars Down to Earth: The Los Angeles Times Astrology Column (46) by Theodor W. Adorno 9 months, 3 weeks ago

By dichotomies of this kind a pseudo-solution of difficulties is achieved: either–or relationships are transformed into first–next relationships. Pleasure thus becomes the award of work, work the atonement for pleasure.

—p.94 The Stars Down to Earth: The Los Angeles Times Astrology Column (46) by Theodor W. Adorno 9 months, 3 weeks ago
100

As to pleasure, it is, according to the bi-phasic approach, mainly reserved for P.M. and for holidays as though there were an a priori understanding between celestial revelations and the present calendar system. For the sake of variation and in order not to make the bi-phasic monotony too obvious, there are exceptions to the rule.

work and pleasure

he later castigates the idea of "pleasure" as being a means to an end (maintaining status, rational self-interest); just like @ me next time adorno

—p.100 The Stars Down to Earth: The Los Angeles Times Astrology Column (46) by Theodor W. Adorno 9 months, 3 weeks ago

As to pleasure, it is, according to the bi-phasic approach, mainly reserved for P.M. and for holidays as though there were an a priori understanding between celestial revelations and the present calendar system. For the sake of variation and in order not to make the bi-phasic monotony too obvious, there are exceptions to the rule.

work and pleasure

he later castigates the idea of "pleasure" as being a means to an end (maintaining status, rational self-interest); just like @ me next time adorno

—p.100 The Stars Down to Earth: The Los Angeles Times Astrology Column (46) by Theodor W. Adorno 9 months, 3 weeks ago
108

You really are explosive during morning without any apparent reason. It’s just the planets testing your self-control. Keep calm. (31 December 1952, Cancer)

from the astrology column. incredible

—p.108 The Stars Down to Earth: The Los Angeles Times Astrology Column (46) by Theodor W. Adorno 9 months, 3 weeks ago

You really are explosive during morning without any apparent reason. It’s just the planets testing your self-control. Keep calm. (31 December 1952, Cancer)

from the astrology column. incredible

—p.108 The Stars Down to Earth: The Los Angeles Times Astrology Column (46) by Theodor W. Adorno 9 months, 3 weeks ago
115

[...] The possibility of acquiring money and property, or even the chance of making a start for it, is much more limited for most people today than it was rightly or wrongly supposed to be during the heyday of classical liberalism. [...] If one cannot gain property as of old, it is suggestively implied that by clever disposition of what one has, by planning and scheduling in a manner appealing anyway to compulsive persons, the same success may be achieved that is now denied to expansive business enterprise. Making charts, timetables, schedules, and similar formalistic ventures severe as substitutes for the actual money making. [...]

constant reference to property matters despite most readers not owning property, some sort of aspirational role? uniquely american, temporarily embarrassed millionaires, they feel like it speaks to them because they will own property one day

—p.115 The Stars Down to Earth: The Los Angeles Times Astrology Column (46) by Theodor W. Adorno 9 months, 3 weeks ago

[...] The possibility of acquiring money and property, or even the chance of making a start for it, is much more limited for most people today than it was rightly or wrongly supposed to be during the heyday of classical liberalism. [...] If one cannot gain property as of old, it is suggestively implied that by clever disposition of what one has, by planning and scheduling in a manner appealing anyway to compulsive persons, the same success may be achieved that is now denied to expansive business enterprise. Making charts, timetables, schedules, and similar formalistic ventures severe as substitutes for the actual money making. [...]

constant reference to property matters despite most readers not owning property, some sort of aspirational role? uniquely american, temporarily embarrassed millionaires, they feel like it speaks to them because they will own property one day

—p.115 The Stars Down to Earth: The Los Angeles Times Astrology Column (46) by Theodor W. Adorno 9 months, 3 weeks ago