Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

an estimate in economic theory of the rent a house owner would be willing to pay to live in his or her own house

32

Owning a home does not yield cash income but has the equivalent effect in that it saves the owner from having to pay rent. For this reason, the application of the comprehensive definition of income indicates that we should impute an income, referred to as "imputed rent."

included in the national accounts, represents about 10% of GDP as of 2012

—p.32 Setting the Scene (9) default author
notable
1 year, 6 months ago

Owning a home does not yield cash income but has the equivalent effect in that it saves the owner from having to pay rent. For this reason, the application of the comprehensive definition of income indicates that we should impute an income, referred to as "imputed rent."

included in the national accounts, represents about 10% of GDP as of 2012

—p.32 Setting the Scene (9) default author
notable
1 year, 6 months ago

a general equilibrium mathematical model of international trade, developed by Eli Heckscher and Bertil Ohlin at the Stockholm School of Economics; countries will export products that use their abundant and cheap factor(s) of production and import products that use the countries' scarce factor(s)

83

In the case of globalisation, what lies behind is the standard international trade model (usually referred to as the Heckscher–Ohlin model after the two Swedish economists Eli Heckscher and Bertil Ohlin), according to which the classes of workers, skilled and unskilled, are employed in two perfectly competitive economies, each with two sectors of production.

—p.83 The Economics of Inequality (82) default author
notable
1 year, 6 months ago

In the case of globalisation, what lies behind is the standard international trade model (usually referred to as the Heckscher–Ohlin model after the two Swedish economists Eli Heckscher and Bertil Ohlin), according to which the classes of workers, skilled and unskilled, are employed in two perfectly competitive economies, each with two sectors of production.

—p.83 The Economics of Inequality (82) default author
notable
1 year, 6 months ago

(aka Baumol's cost disease) rise of salaries in jobs that have experienced no increase of labor productivity, in response to rising salaries in other jobs that have experienced the labor productivity growth

121

Such a bias arises in an acute form in what is known as the Baumol effect, after the US economist William J. Baumol, who argued that productivity grows faster in certain sectors than in others, and that in some sectors there was no scope for producing more output per person.

example given: if cars can be built more quickly, and wages rise in line with manufacturing productivity, then the fact that you can't make (say) education more "productive" the same way means the relative cost of education will be higher

—p.121 Technological Change and Countervailing Power (115) default author
notable
1 year, 6 months ago

Such a bias arises in an acute form in what is known as the Baumol effect, after the US economist William J. Baumol, who argued that productivity grows faster in certain sectors than in others, and that in some sectors there was no scope for producing more output per person.

example given: if cars can be built more quickly, and wages rise in line with manufacturing productivity, then the fact that you can't make (say) education more "productive" the same way means the relative cost of education will be higher

—p.121 Technological Change and Countervailing Power (115) default author
notable
1 year, 6 months ago

(adjective) full of danger or uncertainty; precarious

128

the "parlous state" of German unions

—p.128 Technological Change and Countervailing Power (115) default author
uncertain
1 year, 6 months ago

the "parlous state" of German unions

—p.128 Technological Change and Countervailing Power (115) default author
uncertain
1 year, 6 months ago

(noun) the state of being the firstborn of the children of the same parents / (noun) an exclusive right of inheritance belonging to the eldest son

158

If families practice primogeniture, passing wealth on each time to a single member of the next generation (typically the oldest son), then the total would be unaffected.

—p.158 Capital Shared (155) default author
notable
1 year, 6 months ago

If families practice primogeniture, passing wealth on each time to a single member of the next generation (typically the oldest son), then the total would be unaffected.

—p.158 Capital Shared (155) default author
notable
1 year, 6 months ago

a theory developed by supply-side economist Arthur Laffer to show the relationship between tax rates and the amount of tax revenue collected by governments (a typically conservative theory that believes that too much taxation will depress business investment)

267

the “Laffer curve” is not a new concept, but it is much cited today. The key point is that globalisation and technological change have together shifted the curve downward, so that for any tax rate the government collects less revenue.

—p.267 Globalisation Prevents Action? (263) default author
notable
11 months, 2 weeks ago

the “Laffer curve” is not a new concept, but it is much cited today. The key point is that globalisation and technological change have together shifted the curve downward, so that for any tax rate the government collects less revenue.

—p.267 Globalisation Prevents Action? (263) default author
notable
11 months, 2 weeks ago