Welcome to Bookmarker!

This is a personal project by @dellsystem. I built this to help me retain information from the books I'm reading. Currently can only be used by a single user (myself), but I plan to extend it to support multiple users eventually.

Source code on GitHub (MIT license).

Activity

You added a note
4 months, 3 weeks ago

people who cannot suffer can never grow up

[...] I do not mean to be sentimental about suffering—enough is certainly as good as a feast—but people who cannot suffer can never grow up, can never discover who they are. That man who is forced each day to snatch his manhood, his identity, out of the fire of human cruelty that rages to destroy...

—p.84 Down At The Cross (19) by James Baldwin
You added a note
4 months, 3 weeks ago

no one holds power forever

[...] I am far from convinced that being released from the African witch doctor was worthwhile if I am now—in order to support the moral contradictions and the spiritual aridity of my life—expected to become dependent on the American psychiatrist. It is a bargain I refuse. The only thing white pe...

—p.82 Down At The Cross (19) by James Baldwin
You added a note
4 months, 3 weeks ago

life is tragic

Behind what we think of as the Russian menace lies what we do not wish to face, and what white Americans do not face when they regard a Negro: reality—the fact that life is tragic. Life is tragic simply because the earth turns and the sun inexorably rises and sets, and one day, for each of us, th...

—p.79 Down At The Cross (19) by James Baldwin
You added a note
4 months, 3 weeks ago

frozen on the needle

I remembered my buddies of years ago, in the hallways, with their wine and their whiskey and their tears; in hallways still, frozen on the needle [...]

—p.68 Down At The Cross (19) by James Baldwin
You added a note
4 months, 3 weeks ago

time catches up with kingdoms

[...] Time catches up with kingdoms and crushes them, gets its teeth into doctrines and rends them; time reveals the foundations on which any kingdom rests, and eats at those foundations, and it destroys doctrines by proving them to be untrue. [...]

—p.49 Down At The Cross (19) by James Baldwin
You added a note
4 months, 3 weeks ago

was Heaven to be merely another ghetto?

[...] when I faced a congregation, it began to take all the strength I had not to stammer, not to curse, not to tell them to throw away their Bibles and get off their knees and go home and organize, for example, a rent strike. When I watched all the children, their copper, brown, and beige faces ...

—p.40 Down At The Cross (19) by James Baldwin
You added a note
4 months, 3 weeks ago

behind their authority stands another

[...] Long before the Negro child perceives this difference, and even longer before he understands it, he has begun to react to it, he has begun to be controlled by it. Every effort made by the child’s elders to prepare him for a fate from which they cannot protect him causes him secretly, in ter...

—p.30 Down At The Cross (19) by James Baldwin
You added a note
4 months, 3 weeks ago

it was a criminal power

[...] Negroes who were neither doltish nor servile did not feel that they were doing anything wrong when they robbed white people. In spite of the Puritan-Yankee equation of virtue with well-being, Negroes had excellent reasons for doubting that money was made or kept by any very striking adheren...

—p.28 Down At The Cross (19) by James Baldwin
You added a note
4 months, 3 weeks ago

this cloud that stood between them and the sun

[...] And there seemed to be no way whatever to remove this cloud that stood between them and the sun, between them and love and life and power, between them and whatever it was that they wanted. One did not have to be very bright to realize how little one could do to change one’s situation; one ...

—p.25 Down At The Cross (19) by James Baldwin
You added a note
4 months, 3 weeks ago

you must accept them

[...] the reality which lies behind the words acceptance and integration. There is no reason for you to try to become like white people and there is no basis whatever for their impertinent assumption that they must accept you. The really terrible thing, old buddy, is that you must accep...

—p.16 My Dungeon Shook (11) by James Baldwin
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4 months, 3 weeks ago

it is the innocence which constitutes the crime

[...] But it is not permissible that the authors of devastation should also be innocent. It is the innocence which constitutes the crime.

—p.14 My Dungeon Shook (11) by James Baldwin
You added a vocabulary term
4 months, 3 weeks ago

truculent

a very definite tendency to sound truculent because you want no one to think you are soft

—p.13 My Dungeon Shook (11) by James Baldwin
notable
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4 months, 3 weeks ago
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4 months, 3 weeks ago
You edited a book
4 months, 3 weeks ago
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4 months, 3 weeks ago
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4 months, 3 weeks ago
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4 months, 3 weeks ago
You edited a note
4 months, 4 weeks ago

there is always something unsaid topic / literary-theory why / write

Writing, whatever else it is doing, is always getting at something that it never quite obtains. There is always something unsaid, something that clings to writing like a shadow.

—p.26 Caedmon's Dream: On the Politics of Style (7) by Richard Seymour
You edited a note
4 months, 4 weeks ago

clarity depends on repression

The demand for clarity, in this sense, depends on repression. First, to make such a demand one has to deny the inherent excess in writing. It always goes beyond meaning, because it is matter: which is to say, it is sensuous, aesthetic. [...] Writing does not simply store information but, through ...

—p.17 Caedmon's Dream: On the Politics of Style (7) by Richard Seymour
You edited a note
4 months, 4 weeks ago

Haitians have no exit

Over and over I replay in my head the implications of what we've just done. We told the Haitians that we couldn't physically stop their government from torturing and killing, but that if they told us in detail who was doing it and how, we'd bear witness and seek justice. Eventually the world woul...

—p.169 Condition Charlie (89) by Andrew Thomson
You added a vocabulary term
4 months, 4 weeks ago

rarefied

In which some rarefied notion of ‘civility’ is prized above all else

—p.1 Rhetoric, Responsibility, & the Problem of the Political: Some thoughts after reading Andrew O’Hagan on Grenfell Tower missing author
notable
You added a note
4 months, 4 weeks ago

who died because nobody would listen

So what O’Hagan does, in summoning the spectres of his childhood (a Daily Mail reader’s fantasy of hard-working salt o’t’earth types who “refused to see themselves as victims”), is offer an anticipatory self-defence that appeals to precisely the sort of material analysis he is attempting to discr...

—p.1 Rhetoric, Responsibility, & the Problem of the Political: Some thoughts after reading Andrew O’Hagan on Grenfell Tower missing author
You added a note
4 months, 4 weeks ago

at the feet of the system itself

[...] When he says, disingenuously , that “the leaders of those [other] councils, Labour as well as Tory, are presumably not being accused of detesting the poor for being in power when their managers installed it,” he ignores the fact that the majority of blame has been laid at the feet of the s...

—p.1 Rhetoric, Responsibility, & the Problem of the Political: Some thoughts after reading Andrew O’Hagan on Grenfell Tower missing author
You added a note
4 months, 4 weeks ago

who is permitted to feel?

[...] The question becomes, then, who is permitted to feel? Whose feelings count? To borrow from Judith Butler, which bodies—indeed, which hearts—matter?5 Who do we choose to hear? In tacit response to these questions, O’Hagan grieves the jobs of Nicholas Paget-Brown and Rock Feilding-Mellen at l...

—p.1 Rhetoric, Responsibility, & the Problem of the Political: Some thoughts after reading Andrew O’Hagan on Grenfell Tower missing author